Occupy Movement News Round-Up 12/5

ALBANY:  Mayor Jerry Jennings has decided the Occupy Albany encampment near the state Capitol must leave on the first day of winter.  Corporation Counsel John Reilly says in a letter to protesters that officials will permit the encampment until Dec. 22, while setting conditions effective Tuesday for staying in the meantime.  Permit conditions include limits of 30 tents, two heaters, one generator, three portable restrooms and no cooking or open flames, no food vending and no semi-permanent structures or signs. City officials have let the demonstrators camp in Academy Park since Oct. 21, while Gov. Andrew Cuomo has insisted state police enforce an 11 p.m. curfew in adjacent state-owned Lafayette Park. Jennings spokesman Robert Van Ambergh says the permit terms and winter departure deadline are based on health and safety concerns.

AUGUSTA:  Demonstrators from several religious denominations marched in support of Occupy Augusta activists Sunday, the day before a federal judge was to hear Occupy’s request to remain in a park near the Maine State House without a permit.  Occupy Augusta wants U.S. District Judge Nancy Torresen to issue a court order that would bar the Capitol Police from requiring a permit for the activists’ “tent city” in Capitol Park.  Last week, activists and police agreed to a standstill on the continued occupation until the judge issued a ruling. Protesters agreed to not add to their encampment and police agreed to take no action to evict them.

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What started as the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York in September has spread across major cities worldwide as a call to action against unequal distribution of wealth. Thursday marked two months since the movement began.

Here is a roundup of some of the movement’s most recent developments, including several that resulted in arrests.

NEW YORK

Protesters in New York launched what they called an effort to “shut down Wall Street” Thursday morning at the beginning of a nationwide day of what could be the Occupy movement’s largest protests yet. A heavy police presence was in place as protesters kicked off the effort with the early morning demonstration against Wall Street.

At least 245 people were arrested over the course of Thursday, police spokesmen said. That includes 64 arrested — most all wearing “99%” T-shirts — during a sit-in early in the evening on Centre Street, near Foley Square.

Five police officers were injured when a liquid was thrown on their faces during confrontations with with protesters, Kelly said. The officers felt burning in their faces, but were able to wash off the unknown substance at a nearby hospital.

In addition, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said a 24-year-old police officer was injured when a star-shaped glass object was thrown at him. Speaking from Bellevue Hospital Center, he said “some protesters today deliberately pursued violence,’ but added that most were peaceful and have “caused minimal disruptions to our city.”

By Thursday evening, protesters had begun to stream from Manhattan across the Brooklyn Bridge. According to the Wall Street movement’s Twitter feed, they chanted, “This is what democracy looks like! This is what America look like.” The protesters walked along the pedestrian walkway, not the roadway — as they’d done last month, when police more than 700 had been arrested.

Around that same time, activists projected slogans onto one side of the 32-story Verizon building also in Lower Manhattan.

Activists lifted metal barricades that ringed Zuccotti Park — which had been the movement’s original home base, prior to their conviction — defying authorities and blocking traffic. Residents and employees of nearby businesses were required to flash identification cards as police cordoned off the surrounding area, police spokesman Paul Browne said.

Protesters had said they want Thursday to be a day of nonviolent protest, although it comes a day after a demonstrator was arrested for making violent threats. Nkrumah Tinsley was arrested after being seen in a YouTube video making threats to use a Molotov cocktail on Macy’s department store, New York police said. He also was seen in another part of the video threatening to “burn down the city” Thursday. About 200 people were arrested Wednesday, police said.

LOS ANGELES

A total of 50 demonstrators were arrested Thursday in Los Angeles in two incidents — one in the evening and another earlier in the day — Los Angeles police spokesman Andrew Neiman said.

Bail was set at $5,000 for those arrested, according to Neiman, and not $500 as previously reported by police.

About 300 Occupy Los Angeles demonstrators marched about a half-mile early Thursday afternoon from their encampment near City Hall to a rally at the Wells Fargo Center.

Several protesters were arrested, without incident, after blocking traffic on the corner of Figueroa and 4th streets — an intersection that activists, on a website, earlier vowed to “shut down” — according to witnesses.

The march itself and subsequent protests seemed generally peaceful as people banged drums and shouted slogans. At the Wells Fargo Center, located in front of a Bank of America building, protesters chanted peacefully while Los Angeles police in riot gear watched nearby.

PORTLAND, Oregon

A total of 48 people were arrested on three separate occasions in the Pacific Northwest city, police said, adding that they used pepper spray in one of the incidents.

Twenty-five activists were arrested Thursday morning at the east end of the Steel Bridge, police Lt. Robert King said. All were cited for disorderly conduct.

Also Thursday morning, nine others were arrested inside a Wells Fargo building and later charged with criminal trespassing, according to a press release from police.

Then, Thursday evening, a large crowd of people were arrested at a Chase bank branch after they’d gone inside and refused to leave, Sgt. Pete Simpson told CNN. Some demonstrators were escorted outside, at which point a group blocked the street — impeding a commuter rail line that runs down the roadway.

Simpson said police used pepper spray to get individuals to move, after it “became very tenuous at the front line, (and) there were a lot of people in the street.” The arrests were made both inside and outside the bank, the sergeant added.

One Occupy Portland protesters was taken away by ambulance around 5 p.m., said King. His medical condition was unknown, though King said he believed he was conscious as he was being transported to an area hospital.

LAS VEGAS

Police issued 21 misdemeanor citations Thursday morning after people sat down in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard and refused to move,” police officer Bill Cassell told CNN. He described the demonstrators as peaceful and said there were no injuries among police or civilians.

SEATTLE

About 600 “peaceful” Occupy Seattle and union demonstrators marched Thursday across University Bridge in the northern section of the city, near the University of Washington campus, police spokesman Sean Whitcomb said.

Whitcomb said early Thursday evening that there had been no arrests and no pepper spray had been used. Traffic was shut down in the area, during what was the evening rush-hour, he added.

HOUSTON

Demonstrators from several groups, including unions and Occupy Houston, gathered around 4 p.m. in Market Square and then marched several blocks north, Houston police spokesman Kese Smith said.

There, 12 individuals linked arms and sat down in the road — a major route out of downtown and onto Interstate 45 — and, after refusing police calls to move, were arrested, said Smith. All 12 were charged with obstructing a roadway, a misdemeanor. Another person who was on the sidewalk stepped forward and told a Houston police officer that she wanted to be arrested. After refusing repeated calls to stay on the sidewalk, this woman also was arrested, according to Smith.

The vast majority of protesters exercised their First Amendment rights peacefully and without incident, the spokesman said. They will be booked and then arraigned at the Harris County jail.

WASHINGTON

Several hundred protesters marched down M Street in the Georgetown section of Washington, then on the Francis Scott Key Bridge over the Potomac River into Arlington, Virginia. D.C. Metro Police, in squad cars and on horses, escorted the group.

On the bridge, they were met by other demonstrators who had marched from the Virginia side. Together, they waved signs and chanted, “Whose river? Our river.”

ST. LOUIS

Dozens of protesters broke into a vacant municipal building in St. Louis and tried to hang a banner, according to CNN affiliate KPLR. They did so after about a dozen protesters were arrested during a march on a city bridge.

CHICAGO

About 46 protesters were cited late Thursday afternoon after taking over Chicago’s La Salle Street bridge over the Chicago River for 35 minutes, CNN affiliate WLS reported. No confrontations, meanwhile, were reported as several hundred demonstrators marched up and down La Salle Street between the Board of Trade and the Chicago River.

DENVER

Denver District Attorney Mitchell Morrissey said Thursday that three activists have been charged with felonies — including inciting a riot and second-degree assault on an officer — in connection with recent Occupy Denver protests. Two were charged in connection to incidents that took place on Sunday, while one was charged related to an October 29 incident.

ATLANTA

Six men and two women were arrested for blocking traffic Thursday afternoon in downtown Atlanta, police said in a press release. Atlanta police said those arrested “did not comply” after being given “multiple warnings” to move. They were charged with obstructing traffic.

MIAMI

Led by a police car, dozens of demonstrators marched through Miami late Thursday afternoon, according to video footage from CNN affiliate WSVN. Many held up signs like one that read, “Congress — Good jobs, no cuts,” as they walked.

The Occupy Miami website said that the event would occur between 4 and 7 p.m., centered at Jose Marti Riverfront Park.

DALLAS

Police evicted an Occupy encampment from City Hall property early Thursday, city officials said in a statement. Beginning at about midnight, “police made several announcements, over a 90-minute period of time, via loudspeakers asking for demonstrators to leave,” the statement said. Those that refused to leave were arrested shortly after 1:30 a.m. (2:30 p.m. ET). Eighteen people were arrested, the statement said, and a crisis intervention team assisted seven people in obtaining shelter.

COLUMBIA, South Carolina

Gov. Nikki Haley has encouraged demonstrators to return to the state Capitol on Thursday — saying their signs and chants are welcome, but not their sleeping bags and mattresses, according to CNN affiliate WIS.

In a press conference Wednesday, Haley said the Capitol grounds are for citizens’ use during daylight hours only and should be respected. Law enforcement arrested dozens of protesters Wednesday. One protester told WIS “We’re calm, we’re peaceful and we’re not agitators.”

Occupy events also took place Thursday in BostonMilwaukee,Nashville and other cities around the country.

OWS is calling upon you to participate in an international day of direct action on November 17 in celebration of the the two month anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

If your city is participating in the mass action and not listed below, please send me a message and I will add the details (submit links, ask will not allow for links).

OCCUPY WALL STREET (OWS)
7:00 Shut Down Wall Street
3:00 Occupy the Subways
5:00 Take the Square
This information and more at: occupywallst.org/action/november-17th
First: SHUT DOWN WALL STREET 
Second: Occupy The Burroughs 
Third: Celebrate two months of OWS by marching across the Brooklyn Bridge
All three events HERE 

(via occupiedworld who will be LIVE TWEETING/photographing on the ground via their twitter)
 

OCCUPY COLLEGES
Students across the country will gather together on November 17 to protest the rising costs of college education, and the diminishing quality in that education from universities. Students will strike by gathering in central locations throughout each school, or in solidarity at Occupy Wall Street.
More information at: occupycolleges.org


OCCUPY DC
March from McPherson Square at 2:30 to rally at Key Bridge. 

OCCUPY PORTLAND
Occupying steelbridge in morning 
Rally afterwards
Subsequently occupying banks
www.n17pdx.org
https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=104127476368742

OCCUPY LOS ANGELES
1,000+ people to take over the street of Downtown, Los Angeles. Activists will meet at Bank of America Plaza at 333 S Hope St. and march to the corner of Figueroa and 4th St., where we will shut down the intersection.
www.occupylosangeles.org/?q=node%2F1970

OCCUPY BOSTON
Mass Uniting’s Jobs Not Cuts March & Rally at Dewey Square.
https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=185521434866267

Prior to March @ FSU: Martin Luther King Jr, Stokely Carmichael, American Democracy, and the Search for Economic Justice: From the Civil Rights Movement to the Occupy Movement

OCCUPY MINNEAPOLIS
3:00pm Student Rally @ Northrop Plaza
4:00pm March onto the 10th Ave Bridge
5:30pm Rally on the Peoples’ Plaza (Government Plaza)
https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=189395914476438

INTERNATIONAL

Spain
A general strike of university students will be taking place in the following cities: Barcelona, Girona, Lleida, Tarragona, Palma, Sevilla, Santiago de Compostela, Murcia, Madrid, Valencia, Castello, Alicante, Zaragoza
17:00: Demonstration in Madrid
Place: From Nuevos Ministerios to Puerta del Sol Square
Call: Assembly UAM-CSIC / 15M
tomalafacultad.net
madrid.tomalaplaza.net/2011/11/08/17n-manifestacion-estatal-por-los-servicios-publicos

Belgium
Activists are mobilising for sit-ins at universities and schools to discuss the ongoing protests around the world, resist the increasing commercialisation of education and connect to the struggle on the global level.
ism-global.net/ghent_occupy_nov17

Germany
Massive student strikes, flash mobs, rallies, and other actions will be taking place in dozens of cities
ism-global.net/germany_education_strike_nov17

Live in a smaller city? Don’t know if your city is doing anything?

GO HERE, and plug in your zip code.

OR HERE.

thedailywhat
thedailywhat:
Second Occupy Wall Street News Update of the Day: A New York Supreme Court Justice has reversed the restraining order requiring the city to allow Occupy Wall Street protesters and their tents to return to Zuccotti Park.
Justice Michael D. Stallman ruled against extending the order issued earlier today by Supreme Court Judge Lucy Billings, who was later revealed to be a former long-time ACLU lawyer.
“The court is mindful of movants’ First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and peaceable assembly,” Judge Stallman wrote in his ruling. “[But] even protected speech is not equally permissible in all places and at all times.”
Protesters will be allowed to return, but their tents will not.
Hundreds were gathered outside Zuccotti Park awaiting the final decision. Watch a livestream from the scene below: 
 
Live Updates: NYT; WaPo; NYDN.
In Related News:
— Oakland mayor Jean Quan hints at a possible crackdown coordination among occupied cities; are Occupy London and Occupy Toronto the next to go?; The Guardian’s helpful summary of the city-by-city police crackdowns so far.
— Mayor Michael Bloomberg confirmed in Orwellian fashion the suspicions of a media blackout, saying the decision to bar the press from witnessing the eviction was made “to protect the members of the press”; meanwhile, the list of arrested journalists has grown.
— Read the letter Zuccotti Park landlord Brookfield sent to the mayor that sparked the raid; read Occupy Wall Street’s response to the raid, entitled “You can’t evict an idea whose time has come.”
— Photos suggests the NYPD used potentially lethal long range acoustic devices to help clear out protesters.
— Hipster Cop Rick Lee claims he didn’t know raid took place until after the fact; the 10 most psychotic facial expressions from police officers at Occupy protests; high-res photos from Operation Clean The Park; the most adorable victim of the OWS raid.
— Despite earlier claims, it appears the OWS library is safe and sound. 
— The Occupy Wall Street raid: Brought to you by Chase?

[photo: don emmert via in focus.]

thedailywhat:

Second Occupy Wall Street News Update of the Day: A New York Supreme Court Justice has reversed the restraining order requiring the city to allow Occupy Wall Street protesters and their tents to return to Zuccotti Park.

Justice Michael D. Stallman ruled against extending the order issued earlier today by Supreme Court Judge Lucy Billings, who was later revealed to be a former long-time ACLU lawyer.

“The court is mindful of movants’ First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and peaceable assembly,” Judge Stallman wrote in his ruling. “[But] even protected speech is not equally permissible in all places and at all times.”

Protesters will be allowed to return, but their tents will not.

Hundreds were gathered outside Zuccotti Park awaiting the final decision. Watch a livestream from the scene below: 

Live Updates: NYTWaPoNYDN.

In Related News:

— Oakland mayor Jean Quan hints at a possible crackdown coordination among occupied cities; are Occupy London and Occupy Toronto the next to go?; The Guardian’s helpful summary of the city-by-city police crackdowns so far.

— Mayor Michael Bloomberg confirmed in Orwellian fashion the suspicions of a media blackout, saying the decision to bar the press from witnessing the eviction was made “to protect the members of the press”; meanwhile, the list of arrested journalists has grown.

— Read the letter Zuccotti Park landlord Brookfield sent to the mayor that sparked the raid; read Occupy Wall Street’s response to the raid, entitled “You can’t evict an idea whose time has come.”

— Photos suggests the NYPD used potentially lethal long range acoustic devices to help clear out protesters.

— Hipster Cop Rick Lee claims he didn’t know raid took place until after the fact; the 10 most psychotic facial expressions from police officers at Occupy protests; high-res photos from Operation Clean The Park; the most adorable victim of the OWS raid.

— Despite earlier claims, it appears the OWS library is safe and sound

— The Occupy Wall Street raid: Brought to you by Chase?

[photo: don emmert via in focus.]

Occupy Movement News Round-Up

• This Thursday, November 17, the two-month anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement, protesters will join forces with labor unions and MoveOn.org to hold a “day of action,” aimed at encouraging federal funding of infrastructure projects. [The HillOccupy Wall Street]

• Jay-Z’s Rocawear clothing line has stopped selling a $22 “Occupy All Streets” T-shirt after getting flak for cashing in on Occupy Wall Street but not donating any proceeds to the movement. [E! Online]


• Occupy Wall Street has successfully brought the term “income inequality” into the national conversation, according to a search or news from the last two months. [Politico

• From Wall Street to college green? The New York Times looks at the growth of Occupy movements on university campuses across the country. [New York Times]

• Police are cracking down on Occupiers across the country, break up encampments and making arrests. [NPR]

• Oakland Mayor Jean Quan’s senior legal advisor resigned after the “tragically unnecessary” police raid of Occupy Oakland. [SFGate]

• Occupy encampments across the country are straining local officials and police forces, meaning increased crackdowns in cities such as Portland and Philadelphia. [CNN]

____

OAKLAND:  Riot-clad law enforcement officers cleared out the city’s encampment just before dawn Monday, arresting 32 Occupy demonstrators and removing tents from a downtown plaza after issuing several warnings over the weekend, Police Chief Howard Jordan said. Officials stepped up calls to end the city’s encampment after a man was shot and killed Thursday near the camp and issued an order Sunday night telling demonstrators they couldn’t camp in Frank Ogawa Plaza. Oakland Occupier John Murry, 32, says he believes that police are using a recent shooting near the Occupy Oakland camp as an excuse to breach First Amendment rights. "It is an attempt to give the appearance that they aren’t limiting freedom of speech when they really are," Murry says. [LIVE BLOG]

 Eureka, Calif.: More than 50 Eureka police officers, Humboldt County sheriff’s deputies and California Highway Patrol officers moved in on Occupy Eureka early Monday, arresting more than 20 protesters. No warning or order for dispersal was given. [sfgate]. 

 Philadelphia:  Mayor Michael Nutter has increased the uniformed police patrol near the city’s camp because of safety concerns including combustible structures, lack of an emergency fire lane and growing problems with litter, public urination, defecation and graffiti. “These conditions are intolerable. Occupy Philly is not acting in good faith,” Nutter says.

Salt Lake City: Police arrested 19 people Saturday when protesters refused to leave a park a day after a man was found dead inside his tent at the encampment.

Albany: New York arrested 24 Occupy Albany protesters after they defied an 11 p.m. curfew in a state-owned park. They were charged with trespassing.

Denver: Authorities forced protesters to leave a downtown encampment and arrested four people for interfering with officers who removed illegally pitched tents, police spokesman Sonny Jackson said.

SEATTLE: The Seattle City Council has unanimously approved a resolution in support of the growing Occupy movement. Introduced by council member Nick Licata, Resolution 31337 recognizes and supports the peaceful and lawful exercise of the citizens’ First Amendment right to free speech. The resolution also commits the council to a number of actions to ensure fair lending and taxation. The city will review its banking and investment practices to ensure that public funds are invested in responsible financial institutions that support the community, the resolution states, and also continue to address economic inequality and wealth disparities by race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender. [komonews

San FranciscoSan Francisco police erected barricades near the Occupy SF encampment less than 12 hours after the Occupy camp in Oakland was raided by police.  One police officer told the protesters that there would be “ample warning” before police action. [SFExaminer]

Chattanooga:  The Occupy Chattanooga campsite in front of the Hamilton County Courthouse could face eviction. Hamilton County Commissioners say they’re concerned the camp site could turn into an unsafe, unsanitary problem for everyone. People with Occupy Chattanooga say an eviction from the Courthouse would defy basic American principals. [Channel9]

Detroit:  The Occupy Detroit movement’s permit to occupy Grand Circus Park in downtown Detroit has been extended one more day so that City Council can vote on whether to extend it further, according to a protest organizer. “Our permit will be ending tonight, but the City Council said they would extend it one day so they could vote on an extension at their meeting tomorrow,” said Occupy Detroit direct action committee member Michael Shallal. [TheSouthEnd]

El Paso:  Occupy El Paso’s permit from the city expired Sunday afternoon in time for the Christmas lights to be set up. Most protestors had packed up their things and left, but a few stayed behind. Police arrived and handed out 13 citations. Occupy El Paso will have a meeting tonight at Cleveland Park and decide as a group on their next move. They do plan on attending tomorrow’s City Council meeting to ask for a new permit. [ktsm]


by Braden Goyette
ProPublica, Oct. 26, 2011, 2:56 p.m.

Widespread demonstrations in support of Occupy Wall Street have put the financial crisis back into the national spotlight lately.

So here’s a quick refresher on what’s happened to some of the main players, whose behavior, whether merely reckless or downright deliberate, helped cause or worsen the meltdown. This list isn’t exhaustive — feel welcome to add to it. Click through.