Submission from Edot Blair: Saving Humanity

I’d like to start by saying that I’m a future scientist, microbiologist to be exact. Biology is the study of life, all life and I study life on a micro scale. I know life’s basic principles and these principles can be applied to EVERY aspect of life, all things living. Bacteria live in the MOST SUCCESSFUL biological system on Earth. Bacteria know living. We people and our environment is a biological system (living and non-living). Did you think humans were the most successful? HA! Bacteria that live in biofilms (sticky goo in your bathtub and plaque on your teeth) are 10x more protected then their tyrant relatives (pathogens, germs) that go infecting and killing their hosts (the pathogens food source!)! The bacteria in biofilms work TOGETHER. Each area of the biofilm is specialized for a specific function: protection, organization, food, construction. Of course they communicate (chemical signaling) so all this runs smoothly.  Life for the free floating tyrant pathogens, life is TOUGH! Host immune systems put up a good fight! When they work/live together life’s a breeze. Get the picture? Of course with science there are ALWAYS exceptions but I’m only trying to make a point.

Back in early January (such a SHORT TIME!), I read this quote: “knowledge begins with curiosity" and I took the time out to figure out what I was curious about. What made me go, "hmm, that’s interesting"? My minds journey: tumblr > is marijuana really that bad? > Oh weed is GOOD? > Why is it illegal? > How to change laws > I wonder what this occupy movement is? > Politics > big corporations > Racism > What happened to the black power movement? > Conditioning, mind control > government corruption > taxes > DOCUMENTARIES > global economic crisis the power of perception > The Constitution, humanity, freedom

AND THEN I REALIZED SOMETHING (I am a scientist and problem solver) this all started with me answering my curiosity! I asked my teenage cousin what she was curious about and she didn’t know! She said whatever happens, happens! I asked “so you don’t think you have any control over what happens to you?” She said yes for when she gets in trouble. I asked her what about when you’re not in trouble and her little mind blew!

Humanity doesn’t know it’s in trouble because their closed, small scale minds. Sorry if that was insensitive. The only way to wake people up is to unlock their brains. We’ve been conditioned to think small scale. We’ve been conditioned to doubt ourselves and our ability. Too bad for them my favorite question is “why?” Don’t stifle any child’s curiosity. My mother always told me “go look it up.” That was the best lesson she ever taught me. People think being smart is hard and all about being able to solve math equations. Being smart, intelligent etc is about being open minded and answering your curiosity and that’s NOT HARD. Everyone has the ability to answer their curiosity! You DO have power and control over what happens to you, over your own life.

Ask everyone you talk to what they’re curious about. Have they ever wandered something for so long and never looked it up? The internet is at their disposal. The people’s curiosity will kill the tyrant cat!

One of the largest tragedies of the human condition is the yearning for knowledge and understanding about things we will likely never fully understand (given our limited minds/nature/access/dimension). But not everyone seems to have a driving need to understand everything around them, i.e. a passionate curiosity. Why do you think that is? Has their curiosity simply not been sparked? Or are they simply less curious, more content with not understanding? Furthermore, you have to know what questions to ask and have the faculties to discern plausible answers and facts from speculations and misinformation (a skill not everyone has). Some people struggle to logically jump from one realization to another or to sort out inconsistencies and contradictions. 

Do people think this is simply luck of the draw, akin to intelligence or athletic ability or creative talent, or do you think this is something that can be better addressed in our children’s education? 

Please join us in urging Barack Obama to investigate the Wall Street banks.

Wall Street banks continue to profit from the brutal housing crisis that has displaced an estimated 7 million American families from their homes. After receiving a massive taxpayer bailout, these same banks continue business as usual, with the public paying a heavy price for Wall Street’s corruption and greed. Accountability is long overdue.

One way you can help take action:

1. Sign the petition from ColorOfChange
Sign ColorOfChange’s petition to push for a full investigation, compensation to homeowners, and real accountability for those responsible.

2.  Submit your photo.
Make or print an investigation sign, take a photo of yourself (and all of your friends) at your local bank, and  submit it to our blog.

3.  Spread the word!
Reblog your photos once we post them and invite your friends to do the same! 

Still wondering why you should join us in calling on President Obama to investigate the banks? See the evidence.

Submitted by: investigatethebanks

Finally, after trillions in fraudulent activity, trillions in bailouts, trillions in printed money, billions in political bribing and billions in bonuses, the criminal cartel members on Wall Street are beginning to get what they deserve. As the Eurozone is coming apart at the seams and as the US economy grinds to a halt, the financial elite are starting to turn on each other. The lawsuits are piling up fast.

Rochester Students for Social Justice Mobilize In Solidarity w/ Occupy Rochester

As the nation heads into an election year, the Occupy movement — beginning with the Occupy Wall Street protests in the fall — has spread to local college campuses, providing students with a broader framework for issues and triggering a return of political activism on college campuses.

"We follow Occupy Wall Street’s direct democracy," said Kevin Castaneda, 20, a State University College at Geneseo student who last month helped launch Occupy Geneseo.

While activist students want to be part of a national dialogue in the coming presidential election year, their focus goes well beyond electoral politics.

Comparisons are beginning to be made between today’s nascent student activism and the 1960s, when campuses became hotbeds of social change.

Back then, a quest for equality — sparked by the civil rights movement — and opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War mobilized large numbers of students on some college campuses.

"The key idea was participatory democracy — people involved directly in the decisions that affected them, not just in elections," said Richard Flacks, who as a University of Michigan graduate student in 1962 helped draft a manifesto for Students for a Democratic Society (SDS).

Many of the students in the Occupy movement identify with the broad-stroke themes that have emerged. “The main issue — the one that everyone is coming back to — is that a small group of people have control of the wealth,” said Anna Grohens, 25.

The link between local college activists and the Occupy movement became most apparent on the Dec. 10 march, when about 75 protesters — mostly students — marched from Washington Square to the Liberty Pole.

Speeches were given about rising college debt, education as a human right, the influence of corporations on public education, college endowments and the support for other Occupy movements.

"Zuccotti Park showed that we were no longer willing to lie down and take what we were handed," said Alykhan Alani [submitter], 21, a University of Rochester senior from Pittsford who this past summer formed Rochester Students for Social Justice, which teamed up with Occupy Rochester’s Student Working Group to plan the march.

A core group of about 10 students from local colleges — including Castagno and Alani — meet on Saturdays to brainstorm strategy.

What will come out of this strategy seems to be a mix of raising specific issues on campuses and attending rallies — here and elsewhere — about problems facing students.

[Read the whole article]

Submitted by: djalykhan

In regards to voting

in response to your last post my first reaction is to have not just a third party but a third and fourth party. One liberal and one conservative, otherwise one will hurt the corporate-conservative party or the corporate-less conservative party, and help the other win.  If we have at least two new parties that only have candidates that accept $0.01-$100 donations from American citizens only; this will start to change the body politic of America from the inside out. To me the purpose of these parties would be to challenge the corporate political elite, with the intention of making a new constitution, that incorporates the second bill of rights and strictly limits the abilities of corporation.

Submitted by strive-for-it

Submission by OccupyMovie.com:

This inspiring documentary highlights the unified voices of Occupy movement participants. This compelling look into the perspectives of citizens rallying for change sits in stark contrast to the out of context portrayal of the Occupy movement falsely created by media corporations.

Occupy Movie has been released as a social film experience! You can now INTERACT with each of the speakers in the film. 

To learn more about Occupy Movie and social filmmaking, please visit: 
http://www.OccupyMovie.com

Submission: Students For Occupy

We are a group of 10th grade students from Greenfield in Western Massachusetts. We are doing a school project in our History class about activism. Our group chose to stand behind Occupy Wall Street. We are advocating for campaign finance reform, we’re trying to make the wealth gap smaller, and we believe that the top 1 percent (that can obviously afford it) should pay higher taxes than the 99 percent. If you have any additional information for us or would simply like to follow us to stand behind the fact that students ARE interested in this movement and WANT to be a part of it, you are more then welcome.

http://studentoccupy.tumblr.com/

Occupy Birmingham, UK

FILM: As 2011 draws to a close, campaigners vow to continue to show solidarity with the national and international ‘Occupy’ movement as supporters of Occupy Birmingham share their experiences and reasons for joining the global protest movement.

DATE: Friday 30th December, 2011
LOCATION: Brindley Park, Birmingham B1

Occupy Birmingham - GALLERY: http://bit.ly/uOk17t


Submitted by: nahohlatida
This piece is dedicated to the life of Darwin Cox, a fellow Occupier who made an impression on me while I visited the Occupy Denton camp in Texas. Darwin was found dead in the Denton camp on December 3rd.
Darwin’s Biology
Reivin Johnson
I didn’t have the chance to see the dirt that was bound to be beneath the surface of Darwin’s fingernails. He wore a thick white knit cap beige from grime. A crusty crown with long brown dreads locked in struggle with his head. Hair isn’t dead. It grows through the cracks of caskets into the soil, Darwin’s bed. Rock pillows crafted from the fossils of gutter punk cave people who had tents carved from the guts of canyons with futuristic welcome mats of our nightmare before Christmas. Premonitions of makeshift homes pitched on the ground of a ritualistic occupied zone. Camouflage vest with pockets for whiskey and wine. Blue lotus wrapped with hemp woven with traveler’s twine. Pants with cargo that only a compass can find. And Darwin’s many zippers, the only tracks that train hopper always carried with him on the fly. Is there a big boxcar in the sky? Or is it a gondola with no ceilings open wide? Darwin, that night you followed the North Star we lingered without you clouded by a soft instinct of your departure. That night you set sail three children of the highway passed through the camp like horseman searching for your soul. Their road dog, Patience sniffed at the tent you laid in fainted. But we didn’t know that the train whistle blow was for you to hear it so you could go near it so you could meet Eshu at the crossroads. The next morning the sun consoled us with rain and it poured all fucking day resembling the Earth’s first rotation after Revolution. We left Denton with our wings untied and now we wear them around our necks as bandanas. Occupy. Your face plays in my memory like a Nina Simone song that never dies. And every now and then your smile cuts in and I’m reminded that Darwin means friend.

Submitted by: nahohlatida

This piece is dedicated to the life of Darwin Cox, a fellow Occupier who made an impression on me while I visited the Occupy Denton camp in Texas. Darwin was found dead in the Denton camp on December 3rd.

Darwin’s Biology

Reivin Johnson

I didn’t have the chance to see the dirt that was bound to be beneath the surface of Darwin’s fingernails. He wore a thick white knit cap beige from grime. A crusty crown with long brown dreads locked in struggle with his head. Hair isn’t dead. It grows through the cracks of caskets into the soil, Darwin’s bed. Rock pillows crafted from the fossils of gutter punk cave people who had tents carved from the guts of canyons with futuristic welcome mats of our nightmare before Christmas. Premonitions of makeshift homes pitched on the ground of a ritualistic occupied zone. Camouflage vest with pockets for whiskey and wine. Blue lotus wrapped with hemp woven with traveler’s twine. Pants with cargo that only a compass can find. And Darwin’s many zippers, the only tracks that train hopper always carried with him on the fly. Is there a big boxcar in the sky? Or is it a gondola with no ceilings open wide? Darwin, that night you followed the North Star we lingered without you clouded by a soft instinct of your departure. That night you set sail three children of the highway passed through the camp like horseman searching for your soul. Their road dog, Patience sniffed at the tent you laid in fainted. But we didn’t know that the train whistle blow was for you to hear it so you could go near it so you could meet Eshu at the crossroads. The next morning the sun consoled us with rain and it poured all fucking day resembling the Earth’s first rotation after Revolution. We left Denton with our wings untied and now we wear them around our necks as bandanas. Occupy. Your face plays in my memory like a Nina Simone song that never dies. And every now and then your smile cuts in and I’m reminded that Darwin means friend.

elli-mae submitted: 

Some good news for the big occupations who have been evicted - we’re carrying the torch on. And for those still hanging in there - we’re with you.

The Occupy Wall Street movement looks like it is waning, or at least hibernating for the winter. In New York, Zuccoti Park has been cleared out. The Occupy LA, Occupy Philadelphia, and Occupy Oakland encampments are gone. But if the movement is in retreat, no one told the Occupy Nashville folks camping out on Legislative Plaza, right outside my office doors. Winter is settling in, and over the last week we’ve had torrential rains and freezing temperatures, but they are still out there every morning when I get to work. Occupy Nashville is holding tight to their spot on Legislative Plaza after several interesting legal twists and turns. Their tenacity may make them a unique outfit within their movement.

Tents sprang up at the foot of the Tennessee State Capital early in October. Later that month, reports of all sorts of not-entirely-legal-or-appropriate behavior led Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam to impose a curfew on Legislative Plaza from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. The curfew was announced the afternoon of October 27th. The Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) arrested protesters early in the morning of October 28th for violating the curfew.

I think it is an understatement to say that it didn’t go so well for the Governor and the THP. A Magistrate Judge first refused to hear the charges against the protesters on the grounds that the protesters were not given sufficient notice of the curfew, and released them for lack of probable cause. The THP tried to arrest protesters again at about midnight on October 28th; this time, Metro Night Court Judge Tom Nelson issued an epic benchslap – unable to identify any legal authority for the curfew, he again found no probable cause for their arrest and ordered all arrested protesters released. Release on a finding of no probable cause at arraignment is a very, very rare occurrence. Two in a row? Probably a record. To add insult to injury, the THP was called out for a less-than-covert attempt at infiltrating the encampment. Soon after the arrests, U.S. District Court Judge Aleta Trauger issued an injunction against enforcement of the curfew. A decision isn’t expected until February at the earliest, but I expect it to be well read and well reported when it arrives.

So, the Occupy Nashville protesters are still there. I went down and walked around Legislative Plaza after work for a few minutes last night. It is a surprisingly well organized little encampment, with a mess tent, a first aid tent, a front office, and even a “social media” tent. The protesters are perfectly friendly, and happy to talk to anyone who will listen. I hope they stay warm and safe, have happy holidays, and are ready for their hearing next year.