samslovick

oc-la

Scenes from the New Revolution is a five-part documentary series written and directed by journalist Sam Slovick, whose research into Occupy Wall Street led to his living in a tent at City Hall in Los Angeles alongside the 99% movement for the better part of two months. 

Slovick accessed Occupy Los Angeles at ground level, illuminating stories and faces that were either overlooked or misrepresented by the mainstream media. Told from the center of the year’s biggest story, Slovick articulates the global movement through interviews with its activists, footage from the inner sanctum, and stories from its foot soldiers, bringing the sometimes-chaotic picture of Occupy LA into focus.

Scenes from the New Revolution was produced with the help of Slake, a highly acclaimed literary journal based in Los Angeles. A companion piece to the series will appear in the journal’s fourth issue.

thecaptainoftheship365-deactiva
thecaptainoftheship365:

Hi there.
I went to undergrad at UC Berkeley, and one of my non-science required courses was in protest movements. We had to protest something peacefully as part of our grade, and it taught me the importance of a) giving a shit and b) how when enough people do, great things can happen.
A few months back, when the Occupy movement started to take shape outside of Wall Street and women and men began to join forces and hands to question the practices of our local and national government, I wanted to better understand how people were making their way despite the general doomsday outlook that was prevalent in the media’s retelling of the financial and political situation. 
I found that the de facto forum of dissent, We Are the 99 Percent, had an underlying tone of community uprising and fellowship that, to me at least, had been previously overlooked. College grads were moving back in with their parents and helping pay the mortgage and their student loans; single mothers were trading babysitting duties; those who had a little bit more were helping those with a little bit less. This was the story I was interested in and the one I wanted to learn more about.
I asked two friends who I’ve photographed alongside in the LA music scene - Joey Maloney and Matt Draper - to embark on a one day portrait project in the heart of the Occupy LA movement, on City Hall in Downtown Los Angeles. With the help of a generous grant from When You Wish, we were able to set up a little studio to take portraits of the protesters and observers, while engaging them in dialogue about the movement, their life, their community, and how they were making do with less.
I realized that the time of narcissism and small-mindedness (if there ever was a time) is certainly over. This project and the reports of people across the country standing linked in peaceful protest reminded me of those old days at Berkeley and the strength that comes from helping each other in small, meaningful ways.  
I hope you find something interesting in the photos and stories of the Occupy LA Portrait Project. If you do, please pass it along.

thecaptainoftheship365:

Hi there.

I went to undergrad at UC Berkeley, and one of my non-science required courses was in protest movements. We had to protest something peacefully as part of our grade, and it taught me the importance of a) giving a shit and b) how when enough people do, great things can happen.

A few months back, when the Occupy movement started to take shape outside of Wall Street and women and men began to join forces and hands to question the practices of our local and national government, I wanted to better understand how people were making their way despite the general doomsday outlook that was prevalent in the media’s retelling of the financial and political situation. 

I found that the de facto forum of dissent, We Are the 99 Percent, had an underlying tone of community uprising and fellowship that, to me at least, had been previously overlooked. College grads were moving back in with their parents and helping pay the mortgage and their student loans; single mothers were trading babysitting duties; those who had a little bit more were helping those with a little bit less. This was the story I was interested in and the one I wanted to learn more about.

I asked two friends who I’ve photographed alongside in the LA music scene - Joey Maloney and Matt Draper - to embark on a one day portrait project in the heart of the Occupy LA movement, on City Hall in Downtown Los Angeles. With the help of a generous grant from When You Wish, we were able to set up a little studio to take portraits of the protesters and observers, while engaging them in dialogue about the movement, their life, their community, and how they were making do with less.

I realized that the time of narcissism and small-mindedness (if there ever was a time) is certainly over. This project and the reports of people across the country standing linked in peaceful protest reminded me of those old days at Berkeley and the strength that comes from helping each other in small, meaningful ways.  

I hope you find something interesting in the photos and stories of the Occupy LA Portrait Project. If you do, please pass it along.

mangomonkeyboy

mangomonkeyboy:

Don’t believe the hype, Occupy is educated, they know the deal. They are soilders, artists and the educated.

THIS!

How many people think this guy overwhelmed Fox with awesome before anyone could yell cut? To be so eloquent and point hitting on the fly. BRAVO MOFO, DAMN! Someone give this man a cookie.

charlieusername

charlieusername:

Whether or not you agree with the “Occupy” movement, there is no denying that Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the LAPD blatantly broke United States Constitutional law, in addition to violating the California Civil Code which they have sworn to uphold.

Section 52.1 of the California Civil Code clearly states: “Any individual whose exercise or enjoyment of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of the United States, or of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of this state, has been interfered with, or attempted to be interfered with, as described in subdivision (a), may institute and prosecute in his or her own name and on his or her own behalf a civil action for damages, including, but not limited to, damages under Section 52, injunctive relief, and other appropriate equitable relief to protect the peaceable exercise or enjoyment of the right or rights secured.” Keep that in mind as you read about some of the activities that took place last night.

During the sweep of the park in front of Los Angeles City Hall, Mayor Villaraigosa declared there would be a “First Amendment area” of the park. Last time I checked, the whole of the United States is a First Amendment area! 
The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which guarantees freedom of the press, was 
violated by the LAPD, who declared that only media with LAPD-issued badges would be allowed in the vicinity of City Hall. Only a select number of pre-determined media endorsed by the LAPD were permitted to cover the events of last night’s raid. Members of the press who were not LAPD sanctioned were subject to arrest. (It’s worth noting that members of independent online brodcaster, Ustream, were detained by officers.)

The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was violated, as unconvicted arrestees are having their DNA sampled by way of mouth swabs. These individuals were detained by officers, but were not formally convicted of any crime. The Fourth Amendment states: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no Warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. (Emphasis placed by me.)

Despite all these facts, the protestors and occupiers are, in the eyes of the law, the media, the general population, and our elected officials, are the ones breaking the laws of the United States. Land of the free, indeed.